Crop Report Archives

Scroll down to view an entire year's cycle of a pumpkin crop (plus a couple of surprises).

We'll start in the late fall, after a crop has been harvested.


November 28, 1999

The pumpkin field has been plowed and is ready for winter. A few "reject" pumpkins that were left in the field can be seen poking out through the soil. The squirrels aren't letting these pumpkins go to waste. They've been chewing holes to get at the seeds inside (as can be seen in the second photo).

 

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December 25, 1999

Christmas morning we woke up to a rare amd beautiful sight -- the trees were coated with a heavy white frost. When the sun came out in the afternoon the trees became even more beautiful, but the frost didn't last long with the sun shining on it.

There has been little snow so far this winter, and the pumpkin field is resting under a very light cover of the white stuff.

 

 


EASTER SUNDAY SURPRISE!

Twin calves were born Sunday, April 23, 2000.

Usually only one calf is born at a time.


Memorial Day -- May 29, 2000

The pumpkins have just started emerging from the soil over the last two days. The seeds were planted on May 19.

Note the quarter (25-cent coin) for size comparison.

 


June 10, 2000

The pumpkins have grown a lot in their first two weeks.


June 24, 2000

Four weeks after breaking out of the ground, the pumpkins are starting to bush out. Note the soda pop can for size comparison.

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July 9, 2000

The pumpkins are now sending out vines.
Soon they will pretty much cover the ground completely.

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July 15, 2000

The pumpkins have started to bloom. Pumpkins have both male and female flowers, and if the bees do their job getting the pollen from the male flower to the female flower (red arrow, shown with petals closed), the tiny little pumpkin (blue arrow) at the base of the female flower will grow into a big, orange pumpkin. The pumpkins have spread out considerably in six days (see July 9 photos down the page).

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July 29, 2000

We have pumpkins! They grow a lot in just two weeks.


August 5, 2000

The vines are now covering most of the ground.


September 2, 2000

Many pumpkins have now turned orange, but there are many green ones, as well. The plants continue to blossom and make new pumpkins, but there isn't much time left for them to grow very big. It'll be time to pick the crop in about three weeks.

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September 17, 2000

Here's a nice "nest" of big orange pumpkins. The leaves are dying back, and picking is scheduled for Sept. 23.

Some pumpkins with cows in the pasture in the background, just for the fun of it.


September 30, 2000

The pumpkins are being picked and put in piles in the field. The piles are covered with hay to protect the pumpkins against damage from freezing temperatures overnight.


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To contact us:

Vernon Downing
(or Daisy or the cows)
5323 Royalton Road
Braham, MN 55006
320-396-3296

Dave & Tammy Downing
651-699-3901
e-mail: mail ["at"] downingpumpkins [.com]